Opinion

  1. For ERISA to have a future, return it to its roots

    trueForty years ago, President Ford signed the Employee Retirement Income Security Act into law. It's hard to conceive now, but ERISA was crafted by both Democrats and Republicans with support from both business and labor. Since then, it's protected the pensions of tens of millions.

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  1. Solutions to the pension crisis

    trueIf U.S. pensions funds were to mark-to-market assets and liabilities, they would have a deficit of about $4 trillion. If TARP I was a national emergency at $800 billion, what do you call this?

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  2. Challenges from 401(k) fiduciary breaches litigation

    trueWith ERISA entering its 41st year, commentators highlighting the landmark legislation's successes and failures have paid little attention to the newfound focus on fiduciary responsibility resulting from an increase in litigation from alleged fiduciary breaches, particularly in 401(k) defined ...

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  3. Embracing risk: Perils of aversion and misdefinition

    trueThe investment community is developing a strong aversion to risk at the institutional levels - with serious consequences.

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  4. Canada offers lessons for CalPERS, other U.S. funds

    trueI was a member of a task force created in the late 1980s by the government of Ontario to recommend how the province's public-sector pension plans might be restructured for better performance.

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  5. Kick-starting an internal risk-management dialogue

    trueConventional risk management efforts are often designed to manage risk when conditions are considered normal or in a business-as-usual environment, but not during extremes, which is when risk management is most needed.

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  6. Arbageddon: One day, three deals, all spreads

    trueOn Aug. 6, the first broad-based merger spread widening occurred since the fall of 2011. The breakup of three announced deals that day widened spreads and provided a unique entry point to capture value through the anticipated convergence of these spreads.

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  7. Russia: Assessing the risks and opportunities

    trueRussia has been dominating global headlines in recent months and not for the reasons you'd like to see as an investor or potential investor.

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  8. Why the Halliburton decision matters

    trueThe U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Halliburton Co. et al. vs. Erica P. John Fund Inc. is a significant victory for institutional investors in pursing securities class-action lawsuits.

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  9. Higher yields, without increased risk

    trueWith equity markets at a historical peak and interest rates still low, rebalancing a portfolio is a painful proposition. Rather than investing in traditional fixed income, however, institutional investors can allocate to private credit, which offers higher yields without added risk

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  10. A new DC plan to replace current patchwork system

    trueOur nation needs to replace its existing retirement system — now.

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  11. An asset owner meets challenges of cost, performance

    trueIn reaction to criticism of costs and performance, Karl Koch, chief investment officer of the $27.65 billion Iowa Public Employees' Retirement System, Des Moines, posted on its website the following response on the use of active and passive investment management as well as performance and fees. The ...

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  12. Risk allocation must replace asset allocation

    trueThe investment industry has made great strides in using technology to modernize the investment process. The growth of exchange-traded funds is testimony to the desire to increase liquidity and transparency, and lower transaction and management costs. Transaction fees are ever shrinking. Information ...

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  13. Investors should address aggressive corporate tax planning

    trueSustainable, well-run businesses should pay a fair level of tax, and avoid the reputational, legal and financial risks posed by aggressive tax planning.

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